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The lost Dauphin, an Iroquois chief?

GRASSE STEVENS, Augusta de.
The lost Dauphin; Louis XVII. or Onwarenhiiaki, the Indian Iroquois Chief.
Sunnyside, Orpington, Kent, George Allen, 1887. 8vo. With 3 collotype portraits, 1 of Louis XVII, and 2 of Eleazar Williams (1 tinted). Publisher's green textured cloth, front cover with gold-stamped portrait of a young Louis XVII.
€ 750
Interesting work discussing the theory that the Iroquois chief and Indian missionary Eleazer Williams (ca. 1789-1858) was really the lost Dauphin Louis XVII. It was written by Augusta de Grasse Stevens (1852-1894), novelist and correspondent of various New York newspapers.
The Canadian born Eleazar Williams was the son of a St. Regis Mohawk Indian, Thomas Williams, and his wife, Mary Ann Kenewatsenri. He served as a missionary of the Episcopal Church to the Oneida Indians. ''The Indians eventually repudiated his leadership, however, and as early as 1839 Williams began his pretensions that he was the Lost Dauphin of France, Louis XVIII. ... Williams promised his friends many royal favors when his wrong had been righted; but, doomed to defeat, he died in poverty and obscurity at Hogansburg, NY'' (Dictionary of Wisconsin History).
Lacking half-title but otherwise in good condition. Hinges weak and endpapers browned. Important work for the history of Wisconsin and the Oneida.
Cf. Sabin 30267; for Williams: DAB XX, pp. 255-256; Dictionary of Wisconsin History (online ed.).
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